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Fullstack Blog with Next.js + Prisma

Fullstack Blog with Next.js, Typescript and Prisma

Framework Next.js
Use Case Blog
CSS CSS-in-JSX
Database Railway
Auth NextAuth.js
Publisher Prisma

Fullstack Authentication Example with Next.js and NextAuth.js

With Railway Integration

Without the Railway integration

This is a starter that shows how to implement a fullstack app in TypeScript with Next.js with the following stack:

Before you deploy the application to Vercel, ensure you

  • (Optional) Sign in to Railway and create a PostgreSQL database
  • Create a separate GitHub OAuth application before you deploy your application
  • Update the Authorization callback URL with the URL of the deployed app after successfully deploying the app

Note that the app uses a mix of server-side rendering with getServerSideProps (SSR) and static site generation with getStaticProps (SSG). When possible, SSG is used to make database queries already at build-time (e.g. when fetching the public feed). Sometimes, the user requesting data needs to be authenticated, so SSR is being used to render data dynamically on the server-side (e.g. when viewing a user's drafts).

Getting started

1. Download and install dependencies

Clone this repository:

git clone git@github.com:prisma/prisma-nextjs-blog.git

Install npm dependencies:

cd prisma-nextjs-blog
npm install

2. Create and seed the database

If you're using Docker on your computer, the following script to set up PostgreSQL database using the docker-compose.yml file at the root of your project:

npm run db:up

Run the following command to create your PostgreSQL database. This also creates the User, Post, Account, Session and VerificationToken tables that are defined in prisma/schema.prisma:

npx prisma migrate dev --name init

When npx prisma migrate dev is executed against a newly created database, seeding is also triggered. The seed file in prisma/seed.ts will be executed and your database will be populated with the sample data.

3. Configuring your authentication provider

In order to get this example to work, you need to configure the GitHub authentication provider from NextAuth.js.

Configuring the GitHub authentication provider

First, log into your GitHub account.

Then, navigate to Settings, then open to Developer Settings, then switch to OAuth Apps.

Clicking on the Register a new application button will redirect you to a registration form to fill out some information for your app. The Authorization callback URL should be the Next.js /api/auth route.

An important thing to note here is that the Authorization callback URL field only supports a single URL, unlike e.g. Auth0, which allows you to add additional callback URLs separated with a comma. This means if you want to deploy your app later with a production URL, you will need to set up a new GitHub OAuth app.

Click on the Register application button, and then you will be able to find your newly generated Client ID and Client Secret. Copy and paste this info into the .env file in the root directory.

The resulting section in the .env file might look like this:

# GitHub oAuth
GITHUB_ID=6bafeb321963449bdf51
GITHUB_SECRET=509298c32faa283f28679ad6de6f86b2472e1bff

4. Start the app

npm run dev

The app is now running, navigate to http://localhost:3000/ in your browser to explore its UI.

Evolving the app

Evolving the application typically requires three steps:

  1. Migrate your database using Prisma Migrate
  2. Update your server-side application code
  3. Build new UI features in React

For the following example scenario, assume you want to add a "profile" feature to the app where users can create a profile and write a short bio about themselves.

1. Migrate your database using Prisma Migrate

The first step is to add a new table, e.g. called Profile, to the database. You can do this by adding a new model to your Prisma schema file file and then running a migration afterwards:

// schema.prisma

model Post {
  id        Int     @default(autoincrement()) @id
  title     String
  content   String?
  published Boolean @default(false)
  author    User?   @relation(fields: [authorId], references: [id])
  authorId  Int
}

model User {
  id      Int      @default(autoincrement()) @id 
  name    String? 
  email   String   @unique
  posts   Post[]
+ profile Profile?
}

+model Profile {
+  id     Int     @default(autoincrement()) @id
+  bio    String?
+  userId Int     @unique
+  user   User    @relation(fields: [userId], references: [id])
+}

Once you've updated your data model, you can execute the changes against your database with the following command:

npx prisma migrate dev

2. Update your application code

You can now use your PrismaClient instance to perform operations against the new Profile table. Here are some examples:

Create a new profile for an existing user
const profile = await prisma.profile.create({
  data: {
    bio: "Hello World",
    user: {
      connect: { email: "alice@prisma.io" },
    },
  },
});
Create a new user with a new profile
const user = await prisma.user.create({
  data: {
    email: "john@prisma.io",
    name: "John",
    profile: {
      create: {
        bio: "Hello World",
      },
    },
  },
});
Update the profile of an existing user
const userWithUpdatedProfile = await prisma.user.update({
  where: { email: "alice@prisma.io" },
  data: {
    profile: {
      update: {
        bio: "Hello Friends",
      },
    },
  },
});

3. Build new UI features in React

Once you have added a new endpoint to the API (e.g. /api/profile with /POST, /PUT and GET operations), you can start building a new UI component in React. It could e.g. be called profile.tsx and would be located in the pages directory.

In the application code, you can access the new endpoint via fetch operations and populate the UI with the data you receive from the API calls.

Switch to another database (e.g. PostgreSQL, MySQL, SQL Server, MongoDB)

If you want to try this example with another database than SQLite, you can adjust the the database connection in prisma/schema.prisma by reconfiguring the datasource block.

Learn more about the different connection configurations in the docs.

PostgreSQL

For PostgreSQL, the connection URL has the following structure:

datasource db {
  provider = "postgresql"
  url      = "postgresql://USER:PASSWORD@HOST:PORT/DATABASE?schema=SCHEMA"
}

Here is an example connection string with a local PostgreSQL database:

datasource db {
  provider = "postgresql"
  url      = "postgresql://janedoe:mypassword@localhost:5432/notesapi?schema=public"
}

MySQL

For MySQL, the connection URL has the following structure:

datasource db {
  provider = "mysql"
  url      = "mysql://USER:PASSWORD@HOST:PORT/DATABASE"
}

Here is an example connection string with a local MySQL database:

datasource db {
  provider = "mysql"
  url      = "mysql://janedoe:mypassword@localhost:3306/notesapi"
}

Microsoft SQL Server

Here is an example connection string with a local Microsoft SQL Server database:

datasource db {
  provider = "sqlserver"
  url      = "sqlserver://localhost:1433;initial catalog=sample;user=sa;password=mypassword;"
}

MongoDB

Here is an example connection string with a local MongoDB database:

datasource db {
  provider = "mongodb"
  url      = "mongodb://USERNAME:PASSWORD@HOST/DATABASE?authSource=admin&retryWrites=true&w=majority"
}

Because MongoDB is currently in Preview, you need to specify the previewFeatures on your generator block:

generator client {
  provider        = "prisma-client-js"
  previewFeatures = ["mongodb"]
}

Next steps

Fullstack Blog with Next.js + Prisma

Fullstack Blog with Next.js, Typescript and Prisma

Framework Next.js
Use Case Blog
CSS CSS-in-JSX
Database Railway
Auth NextAuth.js
Publisher Prisma

Fullstack Authentication Example with Next.js and NextAuth.js

With Railway Integration

Without the Railway integration

This is a starter that shows how to implement a fullstack app in TypeScript with Next.js with the following stack:

Before you deploy the application to Vercel, ensure you

  • (Optional) Sign in to Railway and create a PostgreSQL database
  • Create a separate GitHub OAuth application before you deploy your application
  • Update the Authorization callback URL with the URL of the deployed app after successfully deploying the app

Note that the app uses a mix of server-side rendering with getServerSideProps (SSR) and static site generation with getStaticProps (SSG). When possible, SSG is used to make database queries already at build-time (e.g. when fetching the public feed). Sometimes, the user requesting data needs to be authenticated, so SSR is being used to render data dynamically on the server-side (e.g. when viewing a user's drafts).

Getting started

1. Download and install dependencies

Clone this repository:

git clone git@github.com:prisma/prisma-nextjs-blog.git

Install npm dependencies:

cd prisma-nextjs-blog
npm install

2. Create and seed the database

If you're using Docker on your computer, the following script to set up PostgreSQL database using the docker-compose.yml file at the root of your project:

npm run db:up

Run the following command to create your PostgreSQL database. This also creates the User, Post, Account, Session and VerificationToken tables that are defined in prisma/schema.prisma:

npx prisma migrate dev --name init

When npx prisma migrate dev is executed against a newly created database, seeding is also triggered. The seed file in prisma/seed.ts will be executed and your database will be populated with the sample data.

3. Configuring your authentication provider

In order to get this example to work, you need to configure the GitHub authentication provider from NextAuth.js.

Configuring the GitHub authentication provider

First, log into your GitHub account.

Then, navigate to Settings, then open to Developer Settings, then switch to OAuth Apps.

Clicking on the Register a new application button will redirect you to a registration form to fill out some information for your app. The Authorization callback URL should be the Next.js /api/auth route.

An important thing to note here is that the Authorization callback URL field only supports a single URL, unlike e.g. Auth0, which allows you to add additional callback URLs separated with a comma. This means if you want to deploy your app later with a production URL, you will need to set up a new GitHub OAuth app.

Click on the Register application button, and then you will be able to find your newly generated Client ID and Client Secret. Copy and paste this info into the .env file in the root directory.

The resulting section in the .env file might look like this:

# GitHub oAuth
GITHUB_ID=6bafeb321963449bdf51
GITHUB_SECRET=509298c32faa283f28679ad6de6f86b2472e1bff

4. Start the app

npm run dev

The app is now running, navigate to http://localhost:3000/ in your browser to explore its UI.

Evolving the app

Evolving the application typically requires three steps:

  1. Migrate your database using Prisma Migrate
  2. Update your server-side application code
  3. Build new UI features in React

For the following example scenario, assume you want to add a "profile" feature to the app where users can create a profile and write a short bio about themselves.

1. Migrate your database using Prisma Migrate

The first step is to add a new table, e.g. called Profile, to the database. You can do this by adding a new model to your Prisma schema file file and then running a migration afterwards:

// schema.prisma

model Post {
  id        Int     @default(autoincrement()) @id
  title     String
  content   String?
  published Boolean @default(false)
  author    User?   @relation(fields: [authorId], references: [id])
  authorId  Int
}

model User {
  id      Int      @default(autoincrement()) @id 
  name    String? 
  email   String   @unique
  posts   Post[]
+ profile Profile?
}

+model Profile {
+  id     Int     @default(autoincrement()) @id
+  bio    String?
+  userId Int     @unique
+  user   User    @relation(fields: [userId], references: [id])
+}

Once you've updated your data model, you can execute the changes against your database with the following command:

npx prisma migrate dev

2. Update your application code

You can now use your PrismaClient instance to perform operations against the new Profile table. Here are some examples:

Create a new profile for an existing user
const profile = await prisma.profile.create({
  data: {
    bio: "Hello World",
    user: {
      connect: { email: "alice@prisma.io" },
    },
  },
});
Create a new user with a new profile
const user = await prisma.user.create({
  data: {
    email: "john@prisma.io",
    name: "John",
    profile: {
      create: {
        bio: "Hello World",
      },
    },
  },
});
Update the profile of an existing user
const userWithUpdatedProfile = await prisma.user.update({
  where: { email: "alice@prisma.io" },
  data: {
    profile: {
      update: {
        bio: "Hello Friends",
      },
    },
  },
});

3. Build new UI features in React

Once you have added a new endpoint to the API (e.g. /api/profile with /POST, /PUT and GET operations), you can start building a new UI component in React. It could e.g. be called profile.tsx and would be located in the pages directory.

In the application code, you can access the new endpoint via fetch operations and populate the UI with the data you receive from the API calls.

Switch to another database (e.g. PostgreSQL, MySQL, SQL Server, MongoDB)

If you want to try this example with another database than SQLite, you can adjust the the database connection in prisma/schema.prisma by reconfiguring the datasource block.

Learn more about the different connection configurations in the docs.

PostgreSQL

For PostgreSQL, the connection URL has the following structure:

datasource db {
  provider = "postgresql"
  url      = "postgresql://USER:PASSWORD@HOST:PORT/DATABASE?schema=SCHEMA"
}

Here is an example connection string with a local PostgreSQL database:

datasource db {
  provider = "postgresql"
  url      = "postgresql://janedoe:mypassword@localhost:5432/notesapi?schema=public"
}

MySQL

For MySQL, the connection URL has the following structure:

datasource db {
  provider = "mysql"
  url      = "mysql://USER:PASSWORD@HOST:PORT/DATABASE"
}

Here is an example connection string with a local MySQL database:

datasource db {
  provider = "mysql"
  url      = "mysql://janedoe:mypassword@localhost:3306/notesapi"
}

Microsoft SQL Server

Here is an example connection string with a local Microsoft SQL Server database:

datasource db {
  provider = "sqlserver"
  url      = "sqlserver://localhost:1433;initial catalog=sample;user=sa;password=mypassword;"
}

MongoDB

Here is an example connection string with a local MongoDB database:

datasource db {
  provider = "mongodb"
  url      = "mongodb://USERNAME:PASSWORD@HOST/DATABASE?authSource=admin&retryWrites=true&w=majority"
}

Because MongoDB is currently in Preview, you need to specify the previewFeatures on your generator block:

generator client {
  provider        = "prisma-client-js"
  previewFeatures = ["mongodb"]
}

Next steps

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